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DGA Security Blog

Our business security and fire systems experts answer the most frequently asked questions, no holds barred. Read on.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
May 16th, 2024

A two-person rule, also referred to as an escort rule, is a highly effective access control security measure that requires two authorized cardholders to be present in order to grant access to a specific area or item, such as a door or display case. This feature is often used to protect sensitive locations like specific doors, product storage areas, vaults and safes, and server rooms. By requiring the presence of two cardholders, the two-person rule ensures an added layer of security, minimizing the risk of unauthorized access or potential breaches. This feature is a great way to layer additional security elements to your physical access control system. While financial services firms, banks, jewelry businesses, cannabis growers and operators most frequently request these advanced features, they offer useful applications in many other types of businesses and buildings.

Blog Feature

Fire Systems | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
May 9th, 2024

Authority Having Jurisdiction (AHJ) are government organizations, offices, or individuals that have the power to enforce and interpret the requirements of a fire code and approve equipment, materials, installations or procedures. They are a critical aspect of ensuring the safety and effectiveness of fire systems and fire system monitoring. By working closely with the AHJ, installers and monitoring centers can demonstrate their commitment to maintaining a safe and reliable system for detecting and responding to fires.

Blog Feature

Intrusion Alarms | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
May 2nd, 2024

Holdup Buttons are discreet buttons that can be used to alert your monitoring center to an emergency. They silently send a signal to the monitoring center, which will immediately notify the police of the emergency. Due to the serious nature of a Holdup Button alert, the monitoring center will not contact you to check for a false alarm. Your security systems provider will work with you to find a location in your business that allows for the most discretion and convenience.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
April 25th, 2024

A Credential Reader, also known as a Card Reader, captures an access credential's encoded data and transmits it to an Access Control Unit (ACU). The ACU then determines whether to grant or deny access based on the cardholder's access rights.

Blog Feature

Video Surveillance | Intrusion Alarms | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
March 7th, 2024

Thermal cameras are intrusion devices that detect and capture thermal radiation emitted by objects and individuals. Unlike traditional cameras that rely on visible light, thermal cameras use thermal imaging. Thermal cameras detect and measure the heat energy emitted by objects and convert it into a visual representation called a thermogram. Thermal cameras excel in challenging lighting scenarios, including near darkness or adverse weather conditions such as fog, smoke, or haze. This capability makes thermal cameras particularly valuable in applications such as outdoor perimeter surveillance.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
February 29th, 2024

A mobile access credential is a convenient app installed on your employees' smartphones that allows them to gain access to an access point by simply tapping or twisting their phones near the access point. This technology utilizes BLE (Bluetooth Low Energy) or NFC (Near Field Communication) which offers reliable and accurate access. Mobile access credentials widen your access control options beyond the more common access fobs and cards and can replace or supplement the use of physical access credentials.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
February 22nd, 2024

A Passive Infrared (PIR) sensor is a type of motion sensor. This technology operates by detecting movement within a specific area by measuring the infrared radiation emitted by objects.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
February 15th, 2024

The Door Forced Feature is an important part of an access control system. It is designed to activate an alarm if the door is opened without a valid access card being presented or an associated REX (Request to Exit) signal. This feature is especially useful in case of forced entry by criminals who may forcibly attempt to open the door.

Blog Feature

Intrusion Alarms | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
February 8th, 2024

A Door (or window) Contact Sensor is a two-part device mounted on a door or window that causes an alarm condition when the intrusion alarm is armed and the door is open. This alert typically causes an alarm condition and signals the monitoring center to take the next steps.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
February 1st, 2024

A local door sounder is a siren device that provides an audio alert when a protected door is held open past a preset time period, typically 15-30 seconds. Its purpose is to promptly and effectively alert individuals that a door has been held open for an extended period. By doing so, it not only prevents unauthorized access but also ensures that the security of the premises remains intact.

Blog Feature

Access Control | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
January 25th, 2024

A REX device, short for Request to Exit, is a device in access control systems that provides a simple and convenient way to exit through access-controlled doors. A REX device is required for any door secured with a magnetic lock (mag lock). This ensures that individuals inside a secured area can exit in an emergency.

Blog Feature

Intrusion Alarms | Security Terms

By: Isabel Leckie
January 18th, 2024

Glass break sensors are audio sensors that trigger an alarm when they detect the sound of glass being shattered. Glass break sensors work by listening for sound patterns and frequencies of breaking glass, and multiple sensors should be installed to cover the target window area. They are especially popular among businesses that showcase high-value merchandise in a window display such as jewelry stores, luxury retailers and art galleries, which tend to attract “smash and grab” style break-ins. For these types of businesses, their business insurance provider would likely require glass break sensors as part of their comprehensive business security system.